Rule #1.png

While any variant differs from chess by definition, I wanted to make sure that Sovereign Chess is quickly accessible to anyone who already knows how to play chess. To that end, the game feels like traditional chess--two players, same initial armies of black and white, the same pieces with (mostly) same movements.

Even where the rules vary, I wanted them to feel the same. The limitation for queens, rooks, and bishops--eight squares--is the same size as a traditional board. While pawns have a bit more freedom in movement, they still move orthogonally and capture diagonally.

Most importantly, the goal is still the same--checkmate the opponent's king, however you can. In Sovereign Chess, it might be with a blue queen, a red rook, a green bishop, a yellow knight...

So, if you are ever in doubt about what's legal, and if the other 15 rules don't seem to answer your question, simply ask, "Would this be legal in traditional chess?" If yes, then consider it legal in Sovereign Chess.

Let's begin, then, with Rule #2...